Museum of Art

Policy Number: 
II.08.01
Reason for Policy: 

This policy outlines certain matters pertaining to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, specifically acquisition procedures and de-accessioning procedures.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

Museum of Art

Enactment & Revision History: 

Policy renumbered to II.08.01

Technical revisions enacted by the University Secretary on September 3, 2015.

Became a University of Oregon Policy by operation of law on July 1, 2014.

Former Oregon Administrative Rule Chapter 571 Division 51.

Policy: 

A. Museum Acquisition Procedure

(1) Conditions. Because the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art's collections are vital to its usefulness and continued excellence, all acquisitions shall meet certain conditions:

 

(a) They should meet at minimum the criteria of quality reflected in the best objects now in the Museum's collections;

 

(b) They should be relevant to the purposes and functions of the Museum, which include support for the institution's teaching and research in the visual arts as outlined in the University of Oregon Policy Statement "Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art Mission," so as to strengthen those collections in which the Museum specializes and for which it is recognized by scholars and artists;

 

(c) Because the Museum must be able to provide proper storage and care of the objects accessioned into the collections, no object will be accepted which cannot be properly cared for and stored;

 

(d) The Museum must observe all State of Oregon, federal, and applicable international laws on acquiring imported art objects and will not, therefore, accept objects collected or acquired under questionable or illegal circumstances. The Museum endorses the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property, and the 2003 American Association of Museums (AAM) recommended procedures regarding objects transferred in Europe during the Nazi Era, pursuant to an agreement reached in October 2000 by the AAM, the Association of Art Museum Directors and the Presidential Advisory Commission on Holocaust Assets in the United States;

 

(e) Title to objects shall be obtained free and clear of restrictions and qualifications of any type or manner, unless it is deemed by the University authorities (the President or the President's designees) in concurrence with the Museum Executive Director, the Museum Collections Committee, and the Curators to be in the best interests of the University. If an object is accepted under restricted conditions, notation of the restriction must be included in the object's permanent documentation.

 

(2) Criteria. Objects are added to the permanent collection by gift, purchase, bequest, exchange, or other transactions by which legal title passes to the Museum. Before accepting objects to the permanent collections, the Museum Collections Committee shall consider whether:

 

(a) The object to be accessioned is destined for a particular collection area. Objects not so destined shall be accepted only in rare circumstances, including but not limited to situations where it may be prudent and necessary to accept an entire private collection, even though some of the works may not be regarded as having Museum quality, in order to obtain desired works. The Museum Collections Committee shall make specific recommendations where entire collections are to be considered for acquisition;

 

(b) The object is unique or of greater aesthetic quality or value than similar ones already in the collections;

 

(c) Proper care can be given to the object;

 

(d) The object is in suitable condition for use and exhibition;

 

(e) The provenance of the object, as determined by the Director or appropriate Curator(s) is satisfactory;

 

(f) The object is encumbered with conditions imposed by the donor regarding use or future disposition. As a rule, only unrestricted objects should be accepted;

 

(g) The use of the object is restricted or encumbered by intellectual property rights (copyright, patent, trademark, or trade secret) or by its nature (obscene, defamatory, potentially an invasion of privacy, physically hazardous);

 

(h) The object is generally consistent with the goals of the Museum.

 

(3) Appraisals and Donor Tax Deductions. Gifts to the Museum are tax deductible as a charitable donation based on the fair market value of the gift evidenced and substantiated in a manner acceptable under federal Internal Revenue Service regulations:

 

(a) Staff members of the Museum shall not provide appraisals for donated objects;

 

(b) Neither the Museum, the University of Oregon, nor the State of Oregon is responsible for the authenticity and accuracy of the appraisal.

 

(4) Museum Collections Committee. The Museum Collections Committee is an advisory committee to the Executive Director composed of members of the Museum’s Leadership Council, University faculty, and others whose expertise in art and the art world is beneficial to the Museum, in addition to its permanent and ex officio members;

 

(a) The permanent, ex officio members of the committee are the Museum Executive Director, Curators, and Collections Manager;

 

(b) The other members of the committee are appointed for three-year terms by the President of the Museum’s Leadership Council in consultation with and with the approval of the Museum Collections Committee chair, the Curators, and the Executive Director. The terms of office for these appointees shall be staggered to provide for committee continuity;

 

(c) The committee chairperson shall be selected by the President of the Museum’s Leadership Council, and shall hold this position for a two-year term;

 

(d) If for any reason (other than the expiration of a member's term of office) an appointed position on the committee becomes vacant, the vacancy shall be filled in the same manner as original appointments. The replacement member shall serve for the unexpired portion of the vacating member's term.

 

(5) Meetings of the Collections Committee shall be called by the Chairperson of the Committee in consultation with the Executive Director two to four times annually, or more frequently, if so needed. The following procedures shall be followed:

 

(a) For each object under consideration for acquisition, the Director or Curator shall present to the Collections Committee the documentation and provenance of the object and explain its contribution to the collection as a whole;

 

(b) If possible, each object under consideration by the Executive Director should be physically present for evaluation by members of the committee. If the chairperson determines that this is not possible, adequate images of the object shall be presented to the committee;

 

(c) Minutes of all Collections Committee meetings shall be taken and maintained;

 

(d) The Collections Committee may suggest and recommend to the Executive Director for purchase work deemed desirable for the collection when funds are available.

 

(6) The Executive Director shall make all decisions with reference to acquisitions.

 

(7) The Executive Director shall notify donor(s) of acceptance or rejection of objects.

 

B. Museum De-Accessioning Procedure

(1) Criteria. Permanent removal of objects from the collections will be done in a legal and ethical manner. The manner of disposition chosen will represent the best interests of the Museum, and the University of Oregon. An object in the Museum of Art collection can be considered for de-accessioning only if it meets at least one or more of the following criteria:

 

(a) It has physically or organically deteriorated beyond repair as determined by a reputable conservator; or

 

(b) It requires conservation, the cost of which would exceed the Museum's funds or the Museum's ability to raise the necessary monies; or

 

(c) It cannot be either properly stored or properly exhibited by the Museum; or

 

(d) It is, in the opinion of qualified outside experts, of markedly inferior quality and/or there is a duplicate or superior example of the same kind and type already in the collection; or

 

(e) It no longer has study, research or exhibition value; or

 

(f) It no longer supports the mission of the Museum; or

 

(g) It is determined that the work is stolen or fake; or

 

(h) To comply with the November 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) or the 2003 AAM Guidelines Concerning the Unlawful Appropriation of Objects During the Nazi Era; or

 

(i) Object material is potentially hazardous to human health or to other objects.

 

(2) Procedure. Removal of object(s) from the Museum's permanent collections can be recommended only by the Executive Director, the Curator(s), the Collections Manager, or a conservator:

 

(a) After such a de-accession recommendation is made, a de-accession worksheet for each object shall be begun and placed in the documentation file;

 

(b) A thorough search shall be made by the Museum Collections Manager of records and related University archival files to determine legal ownership as well as restrictions imposed by the donor and accepted by the Museum at the time of accessioning. Where restrictions exist as to use or disposition of the object, the Museum will observe those conditions to the extent it is reasonably possible to do so. If there are questions as to intent or force of restrictions, the Museum will seek advice of the University Office of General Counsel. New acquisitions obtained through the sale or trade of the original donated item will be credited to the donor, as a “Gift of the donor by Exchange”;

 

(c) The qualified staff members, including the Executive Director, Curator(s), and Collections Manager, will then meet to discuss the results of this search and to propose an appropriate course of action. If all agree to recommend de-accession, the recommendation and relevant information is then presented to the Museum’s Collections Committee, which shall vote on recommending the de-accession to the Executive Director. A majority vote is sufficient for such recommendation. Final authority rests with the Executive Director to determine whether de-accession should occur. The Executive Director will then inform the Senior Vice President and Provost and the Vice President of University Relations of any decisions made regarding de-accessioning. The results of any de-accession vote shall be recorded in the documentation file;

 

(d) Before any object can be de-accessioned and exchanged or sold from the Museum collections (whether from "permanent exhibition collections" or "study collections"), one recognized professional expert (who is neither a current nor former Museum employee), recommended by the Museum staff, shall be consulted for an opinion on the quality of the object. If the reason for the recommendation is the poor condition of the work, the expert shall be a qualified conservator in the special area of the object under consideration and should additionally offer an opinion as to the physical and economical feasibility of reconditioning the work. This expert opinion shall be submitted in writing, dated, and kept in the permanent documentation file;

 

(3) Disposal. Upon approval to de-accession an object, the following procedures shall be implemented:

 

(a) The Museum Collections Manager shall notify the University Property Control Office and provide copies of supporting documentation to remove the object(s) from the Museum collection inventory;

 

(b) A written, dated appraisal from a certified art appraiser (who is neither a current nor a former Museum employee) shall be sought by the Collections Manager, Curators or Executive Director to establish current market value of the object(s) to be de-accessioned;

 

(c) In order that objects de-accessioned from the Museum collection may continue to serve the purpose for which they were initially acquired, an effort shall be made to place them (by exchange, transfer, or sale) in another non-profit institution. To achieve this end, such objects shall be advertised in appropriate professional publications, which may be online. Such advertisement shall clearly state that neither the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, the University of Oregon, nor the State of Oregon guarantees the authenticity nor the appraised value of the work. This disclaimer shall be repeated in writing at the time of sale, transfer, or exchange. Should it be deemed appropriate and useful for teaching, the de-accessioned work may be retained by the Museum for its study collection;

 

(d) Sales to private parties or profit-making entities shall be pursuant to state law dealing with disposition of surplus property. Whenever possible, the work of art should be sold at public auction in a city outside Eugene. In all cases, the sales should be public, although some works of art because of their nature may be more appropriately sold in the public marketplace. De-accessioned objects shall not be given or sold to any Museum staff member or University of Oregon official whose responsibility includes Museum operations, funding, or administration, nor to their representatives or immediate families. Members of the Museum’s Leadership Council and its Collections Committee also may not acquire any de-accessioned item nor may their representatives or immediate families. Proceeds from sales are to be earmarked for the acquisition of objects that will improve the Museum's collection;

 

(e) Exchanges of de-accessioned objects shall be for object(s) of equal or greater value to the Museum and these transactions shall be made in accordance with the procedures of the Museum’s De-accession procedures;

 

(f) Any transactions involving a combination of object(s) and monies (given or received) shall be negotiated at the discretion of the Executive Director after consultation with the Collections Committee;

 

(g) Copies of records for de-accessioned objects, including provenance, research, and data on publication, and a statement authorizing removal from the Museum collection (signed by the Executive Director and the appropriate University administrators) and any other necessary documentation will be forwarded to the acquiring institution (or individual) at the time of the exchange of ownership;

 

(h) Documentation shall be kept in donor files, showing disposition of object(s). Where feasible, the exhibition label on object(s) acquired through exchange of a donation, or with funds derived from the sale of a donation, shall credit the donor of the exchanged or sold gift. Original records for de-accessioned objects will remain on permanent file in the Museum Collections office, with the de-accession work sheet showing completion of all steps in the de-accession process, including record of means of disposal, new ownership, and the original document showing Museum and University approval of the de-accessioning and the Executive Director's authorization. Cross-references will be placed in catalog card files;

 

(i) The Museum Collections Manager shall initiate procedures to remove de-accessioned objects from the computer inventory records.

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume II: Academics, Instruction and Research
  • Chapter 8: Academics, other
Responsible Office: 

For questions about this policy, please contact the JSMA at jsmadesk@uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027.

Original Source: 
Oregon Administrative Rule

Cancellation of Classes

Policy Number: 
II.01.05
Reason for Policy: 

To establish the University of Oregon policy on cancellation of classes.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

Students, faculty and staff

Enactment & Revision History: 

04/13/17: Technical changes enacted by the University Secretary and policy number changed to II.01.05

02/08/10: Policy number revised from 2.000 to 02.99.01

11/8/85: Approved By President's Staff

Policy: 

Any decision regarding a proposal for campus-wide cancellation of classes rests with the President or the President's designee. In view of the fundamental importance of the University's educational programs, the President's decision to cancel classes will be made only under extraordinary circumstances. The President has delegated to the Vice President for Finance and Administration authority to close the University in the event of severe weather conditions.

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume II: Academics, Instruction and Research
  • Chapter 1: Curriculum and instruction
Responsible Office: 

Office of the Senior Vice President and Provost: 541-346-3186, provost@uoregon.edu  OR

Office of Enrollment Management: 541-346-9386, vpem@uoregon.edu

Original Source: 
UO Policy Statement

Student Eligibility for Activities

Policy Number: 
III.01.02
Reason for Policy: 

To describe student status and student eligibility for activities and office holding.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

Students at the University of Oregon.

Enactment & Revision History: 

03/28/2017 Revisions Approved by University President Michael Schill. Policy number revised from 05.00.03 to III.01.02.

02/08/2010 Policy number revised from 5.000 to 05.00.02

10/04/1985 Reviewed and Approval Recommended by President's Staff

05/01/1977 Issued as AM 17.030

Policy: 

A student who is suspended or expelled from the University of Oregon (University or UO) or who is disqualified for enrollment by the Scholastic Review Committee or Admissions Office is denied all privileges of student status at this institution.

No student may participate in intercollegiate athletic competition unless the student has been certified eligible by the Faculty Athletics Representative. A student is ineligible for any such certification unless the student is currently enrolled as a regular full-time student in good standing, carrying at least 12 term hours of work, unless the student meets the requirements for an exception to this policy under NCAA or Pac-12 bylaws.

To be eligible to hold elective or appointed office in the Associated Students of the University of Oregon (ASUO), students must be a member of the ASUO and also be enrolled in eight undergraduate or the equivalent graduate credit hours (except during summer term) at the University. All elected and appointed officers and candidates for election shall meet additional requirements as set forth in the ASUO Constitution or By-Laws. The ASUO shall notify the Vice President for Student Life prior to the effective date of any changes in eligibility requirements.

Officers of all registered and all recognized student organizations of the University must be members of the ASUO and meet any additional requirements set by the ASUO.

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume III: Administration of Student Affairs
  • Chapter 1: Conduct and Student Activities
Responsible Office: 

For questions about this policy, please contact the Office of the Vice President for Student Life (541-346-1137) or the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics’ Compliance Office (541-346-4486)

Original Source: 
UO Policy Statement

Environmental Policy

Policy Number: 
IV.07.05
Reason for Policy: 

To guide the institution’s environmental plans, procedures, and practices.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

University of Oregon faculty, staff, officers of administration, and students.

Enactment & Revision History: 

Revisions approved by University President Michael Schill on March 28, 2017. Policy number changed to IV.07.05 from 01.00.13.

Approved by UO President, Michael Gottfredson on 4/4/2014.

Approved by UO Senate on 3/12/2014.

Policy number revised from 4.100 to 01.00.135/2013 – Policy revision was submitted to Senate for review. 10/30/2013.

Reviewed and approved by Council of Deans, Faculty Advisory Council, President’s Small Executive Staff on 7/1/1997.

 

Policy: 

Policy Statement: 

The University of Oregon recognizes global climate change, ecosystem degradation, and loss of biodiversity as major environmental challenges.  As established in its mission statement, "We value our shared charge to steward resources sustainably and responsibly." Enacting and implementing an environmental policy will be a positive example and play a significant role in the advancement of environmental stewardship on the campus and in the local and greater community.

The university is committed to environmental stewardship, compliance with the law, and promoting a healthy environment for current and future generations.

Guiding Principles:

  1. Planning and Design:  The university will endeavor to minimize environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of campus buildings and grounds through careful attention to environmental performance standards in design and construction.
  2. Operations and Maintenance:  The university will implement conservation and efficiency strategies that reduce consumption of energy, water, and other resources without compromising high quality learning environments.
  3. Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The university will monitor, report, and strive to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.
  4. Transportation: The university will support alternatives to commuting by single occupancy vehicles and encourage students, employees and guests to use alternatives that minimize environmental impact.
  5. Purchasing: The university will strive to obtain "best value" by balancing, as both appropriate and permissible, life cycle costs and social and environmental impacts when purchasing goods and services.  Where both appropriate and permissible, the university will write specific purchasing policies to guide decision-­‐making on frequently purchased items.
  6. Materials Management: The university will establish and maintain programs that minimize solid waste (including food waste) through reduction, reuse, and recycling.
  7. Hazardous Materials Management: The university will minimize the use of hazardous materials when possible while recognizing the necessity of some hazardous materials for research, teaching, and operations. The university supports environmentally responsible management and disposal of hazardous material.

Implementation:

The  university  administration  will  charge  appropriate  units  with  responsibility  to  integrate  these principles into policies, plans, programs, procedures, and practices. The Office of Sustainability should make relevant documents publicly available.

Reporting:

At  least  once  every  three  years  the  Office  of  Sustainability   should  make  available  a  public report on  the implementation of the Environmental Comprehensive Policy. The Office of Sustainability has responsibility for monitoring and recommending changes to this policy in consultation with the Environmental Issues Committee.

 

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume IV: Finance, Administration and Infrastructure
  • Chapter 7: Property, facilities and planning; sustainability
Responsible Office: 

For questions about this policy, please contact the office the Vice President for Finance and Administration at 541-346-3003.

Original Source: 
UO Policy Statement

Unmanned Aircraft Systems Policy

Policy Number: 
IV.05.07
Reason for Policy: 

The purpose of this Policy is to facilitate the operation of unmanned aircraft systems (“UAS”) and model aircraft for teaching and research; mitigate any risks to individuals and organizations potentially affected by UAS and model aircraft operations; and ensure compliance with federal, state, and local laws, as well as regulations and contracts.     

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

This Policy applies to all University of Oregon employees, students, volunteers, vendors, and all visitors (invitees and licensees) who operate or seek to operate all aircraft, including UAS and model aircraft, on or above any University property or at any University sponsored event.

Emergency landings and landings for emergency support (e.g., Life Flight) are not governed by this Policy.  Nor are UAS flights by University of Oregon employees unrelated to their University employment and not on or above any University property or at any University sponsored event.

Enactment & Revision History: 

Approved by University President Michael Schill on March 28, 2017.

Policy: 

OVERVIEW

UAS and model aircraft offer significant opportunities for teaching and research and provide the University community with valuable experiences in a wide range of disciplines. At the same time, UAS and model aircraft present unique health and safety risks, environmental risks, regulatory issues, and privacy concerns that must be balanced with the University’s other missions.  The University of Oregon is committed to providing an academically vigorous, safe, and secure environment for all individuals.  Inherent risks in operation of UAS and model aircraft necessitate proper safety practices, privacy restrictions, insurance protections, and requisite oversight of and authority for operation of UAS and model aircraft on University property, University sponsored events, or offsite in support of the University’s research, teaching, and business activities.

Operation of UAS and model aircraft is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) and federal, state, and local laws.  The University shall develop procedures to comply with this Policy and all applicable statutory and regulatory expectations governing the operation of UAS and model aircraft, and to reduce risks to safety, security, and privacy.

Any UAS or model aircraft operation by University employees, students, volunteers, vendors, and all visitors (invitees and licensees) must be approved in advance by Safety and Risk Services’ (“SRS”) Chief Resiliency Officer (or their designee) through the UAS Procedures referenced below.  All such operations must also comply with all federal, state, and local laws and University policies. 

GUIDELINES

I.          Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation (“Research and Innovation”) and Safety and Risk Services (“SRS”), will assist with processing requests for UAS and model aircraft activities consistent with applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations and University of Oregon (UO) policy requirements.

II.         FAA regulations; federal, state, and local laws; and applicable UO policies must be followed in conjunction with any UAS or model aircraft activities.

III.        Operation of UAS or model aircraft on any UO property or at any UO sponsored event is prohibited unless approved in advance by SRS’ Chief Resiliency Officer or their designee.  SRS will seek review and input from Research and Innovation, the UO Police Department (UOPD), the Office of the General Counsel (OGC), and other stakeholders familiar with a particular request.

IV.        Do not use UAS or model aircraft to monitor or record activities where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy.

A.         Using a UAS or model aircraft to record or observe areas such as camps or campus settings where minors are cared for or taught is prohibited unless expressly approved by SRS in advance.

B.         UAS and model aircraft must not be used for unapproved recordings of any campus events or performances, or for any unlawful purpose.

C.         Do not use a UAS or model aircraft to see inside a building unless expressly approved by SRS in advance.

V.         Do not operate or participate in the use of UAS or model aircraft while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or in a reckless or careless manner.

VI.        Do not operate UAS or model aircraft directly over non-participants in the flight operations unless expressly approved by FAA and UO.

VII.       Do not fly a UAS or model aircraft beyond line of sight. 

VIII.      Under FAA guidelines, Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs) may be implemented on UO property or at any UO sponsored event, which prohibit any type of UAS or model aircraft operations from taking place (e.g., UO sporting events).  As needed, UO may issue additional “No Drone Zones” on UO property or at any UO sponsored event, which prohibit any type of UAS operations from taking place.  (For example, the FAA prohibits all aircraft at or below 3,000 feet within a 3-mile radius of any stadium with a seating capacity of 30,000 or more people when there is a NCAA Division I football game occurring and one hour before and after the game.)

IX.        The operation of UAS by UOPD and/or the UO Emergency Operations Center (EOC) may be exempt from this policy based on the determination of emergency needs.  During such operations UOPD will follow internal department protocols consistent with federal, state, and local laws.

X.         UAS Operated for Civil/Commercial or Public Operations/Government Purposes on Behalf of the University of Oregon.

A.         Any University employee wishing to operate a UAS as part of their University employment, or any student, volunteer, vendor, or visitor (invitee or licensee) wishing to operate a UAS on behalf of UO, must do so under a Section 333 Exemption and              Certificate of Authorization (COA) issue by the FAA, or a civil operation under Part 107. 
B.         UAS owned by the UO of Oregon and used on behalf of the UO for Civil/Commercial or Public Operations/Government purposes will be operated under the authorization of the FAA, applicable federal, state, and local laws, and the UAS policy and procedures.

1.         This authorization could take the form of an FAA Section 333 Exemption or Part 107 approval (for civil/commercial use) or a Public Use COA (for public/government use), and will be limited to a specific location and outline the conditions, parameters, and limitations of flight operations.

2.         Those operating UAS under an FAA Section 333 Exemption or Part 107 approval must also review and be aware of all FAA specifications, and file for any necessary amendments in advance.

3.         UAS owned and operated by the UO and used for Civil/Commercial or Public Operations/Government purposes on behalf of the UO must also comply with any applicable state law requirements, such as UAS registration with the Oregon Department of Aviation.

4.         UOPD will work in conjunction with Research and Innovation, OGC, and local law enforcement jurisdictions for any UO sponsored events that do not occur on UO property.

XI.        UAS Operated for Hobby or Recreational Purposes (“Model Aircraft”) on University Property or at a UO-Sponsored Event.

A.         All UAS operated for a hobby or recreational purpose on UO property or at a UO-sponsored event are considered “model aircraft” for purposes of this policy. 

B.         Individuals may operate model aircraft for recreational purposes, provided that they obtain prior approval from SRS under the processes outlined in the UAS procedures and follow federal, state, and local law and UO policies, including but not limited to FAA guidelines and the Student Conduct Code.  Furthermore, the model aircraft remote pilot must comply with all federal, state, and local laws, UO policies, and the additional safety requirements listed in Section II.B of the UAS procedures.

C.         Any remote pilot of a model aircraft flown for hobby or recreational purposes on UO Property or at a UO-sponsored event found to be operating in an unsafe manner may, in addition to the consequences listed below (“Accountability”), be prohibited from additional flights on UO Property or at UO-sponsored events.

XII.       Data recorded from operation of a UAS on behalf of UO, including images, video and audio recordings, shall be maintained in accordance with university records retention policies and schedules and UAS procedures.

ACCOUNTABILITY

I.          Any individual or organization found to be operating a UAS or model aircraft on UO property or at a UO sponsored event in violation of any federal, state, or local law, or applicable UO policies or procedures (including the UAS Policy and procedures) will subject the responsible persons to discipline in accordance with applicable UO policies and Collective Bargaining Agreements (“CBAs”), an order to cease operation of the aircraft, and/or an order to leave the premises or property owned or controlled by UO.  Violators will be held accountable for their actions, including but not limited to:

A.         Volunteers are subject to reprimand or loss of volunteer status.

B.         Students are subject to the Student Conduct Code.

C.         Employees are subject to corrective action up to and including termination pursuant to applicable UO policies and CBAs.

D.         All are subject to the consequences resulting from the violation of federal, state, and local laws, which may include civil or criminal liability. 

II.         Violations will be considered in future UAS and model aircraft requests.

III.        Legal prohibitions regarding physical presence on campus, trespassing, and other legal action may also be pursued against individuals and organizations that operate UAS or model aircraft in violation of this policy and its procedures.

IV.        UO is not responsible for any damage resulting to a UAS or model aircraft.  Fines or damages incurred by individuals that do not comply with the UAS policy and/or procedures will not be paid by UO, and the remote pilot(s) will be responsible for any property damage or losses resulting from the operation of UAS or model aircraft.

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume IV: Finance, Administration and Infrastructure
  • Chapter 5: Public Safety and Risk Services
Responsible Office: 

For questions about this policy, please contact the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation at 541-346-2090.       

Original Source: 
UO Policy (New)

Protection of Minors

Policy Number: 
IV.05.06
Reason for Policy: 

This policy intends to outline responsibilities related to the protection of minors at the university. Employees of Oregon higher education institutions, including the University of Oregon, are by law subject mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect.  The university has additional reporting and training requirements for university-affiliated youth programs and activities. The university is committed to providing a safe environment for participants in university-affiliated youth programs and activities.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

All employees of the university will gain further clarity as to their obligations and minors who participate in university-affiliated youth programs will be better-served.

Enactment & Revision History: 

Approved by University President Michael Schill on March 28, 2017.

Policy: 

The University of Oregon is committed to complying with mandatory reporting legal obligations and providing a safe and positive experience for minors. Faculty, staff, students, student employees, including undergraduate and graduate employees, and volunteers are expected to hold themselves to the highest standards of conduct when interacting with minors. This policy and the associated Youth Programs procedures (https://hr.uoregon.edu/hr-programs-services/youth-programs-protecting-minors) mandate university-wide standards for those in the university community with the goal of protecting minors. This policy should be read and interpreted to be consistent with state and federal law.

1.            Mandatory Reporting Requirements

Pursuant to the Oregon Child Abuse Reporting Statutes, all university employees have a duty to make a report to the Oregon Department of Human Services or a law enforcement agency when there is reasonable cause to believe any child with whom the employee comes in contact has suffered abuse or that any person with whom the employee comes in contact has abused a child.  For instances that relate to UO authorized activities, all UO employees are expected to make the report immediately to the University of Oregon Police Department.  For purposes of this reporting responsibility, “abuse” includes, but is not limited to:

•             assault of a child;

•             physical injury to a child caused by other than accidental means;

•             any mental injury to a child caused by cruelty to a child;

•             rape of a child;

•             sexual abuse;

•             sexual exploitation;

•             negligent treatment or maltreatment of a child;

•             threatened harm to a child;

•             buying or selling of a child;

•             allowing a child on the premises where methamphetamine is being manufactured; and

•             unlawful exposure to a controlled substance that subjects a child to risk of harm.

The duty of employees of public universities to report incidents of child abuse applies at all times, not just to those incidents occurring during working hours or on campus. For this purpose, university employees include all faculty and staff, student employees including graduate employees, and temporary employees.

Under the law, reports must be made to the local office of the Department of Human Services or to a law enforcement agency in the county where the reporting employee identifies child abuse. Failure to report when required to do so is a Class A violation. Persons who make reports in good faith are immune from liability for making the report. For instances that relate to UO-authorized activities, UO employees are expected to make the report immediately to the UO Police Department (541-346-2919).

2. University-affiliated youth programs standards

Events, operations, endeavors, or activities designed for participation by minors and organized by the University of Oregon in which university employees or volunteers are responsible for the care, custody, or control of minors (“youth programs”) have required standards outlined in the Youth Program Procedures. Youth programs include but are not limited to day camps, overnight camps, clinics, instructional programs, and sports camps. The procedures apply to all faculty and staff, student employees including graduate employees, temporary employees and anyone else employed by the University of Oregon (“university employees”) as well as volunteers who work in youth programs.

These standards do not apply to:

•             Undergraduate or graduate academic programs, classes, or activities in which all individuals under the age of 18 are enrolled students or students admitted for enrollment.

•             Events open to the public that minors may attend, but where the university is not accepting care, custody, or control for the minor(s), as those terms are defined in the implementing procedures.

•             Non-Youth programs where minors are working for the university as employees, volunteers, or interns. University employees and volunteers will be required to comply with the conduct requirements when working with minors.

All university employees will be required to comply with mandatory reporting requirements under this policy and any implementing procedures and under the law.

Youth programs and university employees and volunteers working with youth programs must comply with the Youth Programs procedures, including standards for:

a.            Mandatory reporting

b.            Criminal background checks

c.             Conduct requirements

d.            Training

e.            Registration of programs

Non-compliance of the youth program procedures may result in discipline up to and including termination of employment or volunteer duties.

To the extent there is a conflict between a separate state or federal law or to the extent that state or federal law already regulate an activity (e.g. licensed child care facilities, Institutional review board (IRB)-approved research), the state or federal law will supersede this policy.

Procedures:   Youth Programs as referenced in the Protection of Minors Policy

The following Youth Programs procedures provide the standards referenced in the Protection of Minors Policy.

Scope: These procedures apply to youth programs covered by the Youth Programs policy.

  1. Mandatory Reporting

Pursuant to the Oregon Child Abuse Reporting Statutes and university Protection of Minors policy, all university employees have a duty to make a report to the Oregon Department of Human Services or a law enforcement agency when there is reasonable cause to believe any child with whom the employee comes in contact has suffered abuse or that any person with whom the employee comes in contact has abused a child.  For instances that related to UO authorized activities, UO employees are expected to make the report immediately to the University of Oregon Police Department. 

  1. Criminal Background Checks

The university will conduct criminal background checks for any university employee or volunteer working in youth programs consistent with university policy on background checks and applicable Collective Bargaining Agreements.  If a criminal background check reveals information that could affect the individual’s suitability for their role in the youth program, the university will follow its usual policies and procedures regarding confidentiality, assessing the results, informing the youth program and the individual, and any other processes.

 

  1. Conduct Requirements
  1. In addition to mandatory reporting requirements, university employees and volunteers shall report known violations of these procedures to their supervisor, youth program administrator, or anonymously report to the Reporting Hotline
  1. When working in youth programs, individuals agree to:
    1. Conduct themselves in a courteous and respectful manner, exhibit good sportsmanship, and be a positive role model for minors.
    2. Respect, adhere to, and enforce the rules, policies, and guidelines established by the youth program, this policy, and the university.
    3. Endeavor to provide a safe and healthy experience for all participants.
    4. Endeavor to avoid private one-on-one situations with a minor.
    5. Refrain from engaging in any criminal activity.
    6. Refrain from making comments of a sexual nature in the presence of a minor or making sexually explicit materials available to a minor.
    7. Comply with all applicable civil rights laws and policies, including and not limited to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination policies.
    8. Not, under any circumstances, physically, sexually, verbally, or emotionally abuse or fail to provide the basic necessities of care applicable to the youth program, such as food or shelter, to participants.
  2. Supervision of minors:
    1. The number of supervisors required at a youth program shall be determined by taking into account all aspects of the program, including the age of participants, number of participants, the nature of the activity, and the age and experience of the adult supervisors. In setting an appropriate ratio, it is recommended that the program administrator consult the American Camp Association (ACA) standards.
    2. Youth programs shall establish a procedure for checking minors in and out of the program. Minors who are school age (K-12) may be checked in or out in an alternative way (e.g. transport by bus, walking home) if the minor has written permission of parent or legal guardian to check in and out in the manner described in writing.

 

  1. Training
  1. Youth Program administrators and sponsoring departments are responsible for confirming that university employees and volunteers working in their youth programs will have training on the following topics:
    1. Child abuse awareness and prevention
    2. Reporting suspected child abuse and neglect
    3. All requirements of the policy and these procedures
  1. Human Resources and partner departments will provide resources to Youth Program administrators and sponsoring departments to facilitate completion of the training requirements. Such resources are currently available online: http://hr.uoregon.edu/minors-campus.

 

  1. Registration of programs
  1. Each youth program must be registered annually with the Office of Risk Management.
  1. Youth programs hosted by third-party contractors must be registered by the university entity facilitating the contract.

Definitions:

To the extent there is a conflict between the below definitions and any term defined in the Youth Protection Policy, the Youth Protection Policy definition controls.

Youth Program: all events, operations, endeavors, or activities designed for participation by minors and organized by the University of Oregon in which university employees or volunteers are responsible for the care, custody, or control of minors. Youth programs includes but is not limited to day camps, overnight camps, clinics, instructional programs, and sports camps.  Youth Program does not include the following:

  • Undergraduate or graduate academic programs, classes, or activities in which all individuals under the age of 18 are enrolled students or students admitted for enrollment.
  • Events open to the public that minors may attend, but where the university is not accepting care, custody, or control for the minor(s), as those terms are defined in the implementing procedures.
  • Non-Youth programs where minors are working for the university as employees, volunteers, or interns. University employees and volunteers will be required to comply with the conduct requirements when working with minors.
  • University employees or volunteers who may have incidental contact with minors but do not work directly with minors in a youth program. All university employees will be required to comply with mandatory reporting requirements under this policy and any implementing procedures and under the law.

 

Minor: a person under the age of 18 years

Care, custody, or control of minors: when an adult is present and has primary responsibility for supervision of minors at any given point throughout the Youth Program. At least one adult must have care, custody, or control of minors at all times during the Youth Program.

Working in youth programs: when a university employee or volunteer, as part of their duties in the youth program, is present with minors who are participating in a youth program, but the adult does not necessarily have care, custody, or control for the minors because another adult has care, custody, or control

University employee: a faculty member, staff member (including an officer of administration), student employee (including a graduate employee), temporary employee, or anyone else employed by the University of Oregon.

Volunteer: any individual providing services on behalf of the university for no remuneration or expectation that he or she will be compensated except for the reimbursement of actual expenses. This includes interns or students.

Youth Program administrator: a person who is responsible for a youth program which may include human resources, financial, marketing, and strategic operations.

Private one-on-one interactions: An intentional or purposeful interaction where one individual to whom the policy applies is alone with one minor.

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume IV: Finance, Administration and Infrastructure
  • Chapter 5: Public Safety and Risk Services
Responsible Office: 

For questions about this policy, please contact the Office of the Vice President for Finance and Administration at 541-346-3003.

Original Source: 
UO Policy (New)

Mobile Technology, Payment Options For

Policy Number: 
06.00.11
Reason for Policy: 

This policy creates a comprehensive framework and general guidelines for decision-making regarding costs and payment methods for Mobile Technology related to employment activities. This policy is the responsibility of the Business Affairs Office.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

Those with mobile technology required for work.

Enactment & Revision History: 

03/29/17 Technical change made by the University Secretary

12/28/2010 Reviewed and Approved by President Richard Lariviere

Policy: 

Policy Statement: 

Purchases of Mobile Technology and/or reimbursement to employees who utilize Mobile Technology to conduct university business are governed by the principles, general considerations, and payment options described below.

General Guidelines

  • Cellular phones, smart phones, personal digital assistants and similar devices (Mobile Technology) have become commonplace, are readily available, and are convenient mechanisms to support university business practices.
  • Provision of university funds for Mobile Technology must meet a general need of the university. The Dean, Director, Department and/or other Unit Head is best-suited to determine if a specific employee or job classification requires the use of university-sponsored Mobile Technology, and to what extent. Guidelines regarding this determination are available in the Access to Mobile Technology Policy.
  • University data and information transmitted via Mobile Technology remains the property of the University of Oregon, subject to all appropriate rules and policies, including those covering public records.

University data and information transmitted or stored on Mobile Technology, particularly that data considered protected or sensitive, will be subject to the Baseline Standards of Care detailed in the University of Oregon Information Security Policy which is currently being developed.

Payment Options

Each vice president is authorized to determine which payment options are available to units in his/her portfolio.

  • Unit Purchase

o The employing unit:

-- Purchases the device and/or pays for the service contract, based upon unit business needs. Choice of contract for unit purchased devices is limited to service contracts negotiated by the university or the State of Oregon. Exceptions may be granted by the appropriate dean or vice president or senior administrator if an alternate service provider better meets the business needs of the unit.

-- Retains ownership of the device and maintains inventory controls over the device.

-- Administers the service plan for the device, or coordinates administration of the plan through UO Network and Telecommunications Services (NTS).

o Personal use of a university-purchased device should be minimal. If costs are incurred due to personal use, the employee will be responsible for those costs and will reimburse the university in a timely manner.

  • Employee Allowance

o The unit provides an allowance to the employee who, in turn, purchases a device and/or service contract. The employee owns the equipment and is responsible for all costs associated with the device and service.

o The allowance will be processed through the payroll system and is reported as income according to federal and state regulations. Any tax liability is the responsibility of the employee.

o Allowance categories/tiers and amounts are determined in accordance with university guidelines maintained by the Director of Business Affairs. These guidelines shall be published annually on January 1.

Tiers/Cost Limitations

Recommended payment tiers (as of policy publication date):

Tier 1 - Occasional/Infrequent Use - Example: No-contract cellular phones with prepaid or pay-as-you-go minutes - $10.50/month

Tier 2 - Routine Use - Example: Typical cellular phone plan with unlimited talk, long distance, text - $46.00/month

Tier 3 - Advanced Mobile Devices - Example: Blackberry Curve, Apple iPhone - $103.00/month

Tier 4 - International Users and Other Exceptional Circumstances - Example: International roaming service, Satellite Phone service - To be determined on a case-by-case basis

Charges to Grants and Contracts

Payment for Mobile Technology must comply with regulations related to the specific grant or contract.  The Office of Research Services and Administration is responsible for communicating the regulations for individual grants and contracts.

Procedures: 

For university-purchased Mobile Technology, unit can either contact UO Network and Telecommunication Services for assistance or follow established unit practice for purchasing/contracting. For employee stipends, unit should contact Accounts Payable for assistance.

Who is Governed by this Policy: 

  • Faculty including instructional and research faculty who utilize Mobile Technology to perform job responsibilities
  • Staff who utilize Mobile Technology to perform job responsibilities
  • Other: Student employees who utilize Mobile Technology to perform job responsibilities

Who Should Know This Policy: 

  • University personnel who utilize Mobile Technology to conduct university business
  • Deans, Directors, Department and/or Unit Heads, and Vice Presidents who make decisions regarding employee use of Mobile Technology
  • University staff charged with administering this Mobile Technology policy including  supervisors of all personnel who utilize mobile technology
Chapter/Volume: 
Responsible Office: 

Office of the Vice President of Finance and Administration: 541-346-3003, vpfa@uoregon.edu

Travel Policy

Policy Number: 
IV.04.02
Reason for Policy: 

This policy provides guiding principles for university-related travel.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

This policy applies to employees, students, board/committee members, prospective employees, volunteers, and independent contractors who travel on behalf of the university or on university business.

Enactment & Revision History: 

Approved by University President Michael Schill on March 29, 2017.

Policy: 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

  • Faculty, staff, and student travel is necessary to support and enhance the university’s mission
  • Travelers are expected to be, and believed to be, reasonable and prudent utilizing university resources for travel
  • Budget Authorities are accountable and responsible for appropriate use of university resources.  Departments are free to create policies/limits that are more restrictive (but not less restrictive) than university-wide policies/limits
  • University processes related to travel reimbursements should not be overly onerous so as to negatively affect travelers (including guests, visitors, recruits, etc.)
  • Travel reimbursement processes should be clear, consistent, transparent, convenient, efficient, and compliant
  • Travel reimbursements are for business-related expenses only, not for personal expenses of the traveler or any traveling companions

APPROVAL

Travel expenses will be reimbursed provided the trip and reimbursement request are approved by authorized campus personnel (generally the traveler’s supervisor or designee). Travel authorizations may be oral or written. Blanket authorization for a series of trips may be approved. Employees whose duties require frequent or continuous travel are considered to have approval when travel is within the usual limits of their duties.

PERSONS ELIGIBLE FOR TRAVEL-EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT

[1] Employees

University of Oregon employees may be reimbursed for expenses incurred in connection with official travel.

[2] Employees on Leave

Travel expenses incurred during sabbatical leave may be paid/reimbursed when the travel was approved by Academic Affairs as part of the application for sabbatical leave.  Payment/reimbursement for travel expenses while on other types of leave is warranted only in exceptional circumstances.

[3] University of Oregon Board of Trustees Members and Unpaid Members of university Advisory Committees

University of Oregon Board of Trustees members and unpaid members (non-university personnel) of university advisory committees may be reimbursed for actual and reasonable expenses, including mileage and gratuity.

[4] Prospective Employees

Travel expenses incurred in connection with prospective university employee interviews and recruitment are reimbursable when properly authorized.

[5] New Employees

New employees may be reimbursed for travel and moving expenses as approved by the hiring authority and in accordance with Fiscal Policy Manual 66.200, Moving Expenses Policy.

[6] Students

Students who travel as employees or officially-designated representatives of the university may be reimbursed for travel expenses.

[7] Non-Employees/Volunteer Workers/Independent Contractors

Individuals not listed above may only be reimbursed for travel expenses incurred in conjunction with providing a service to campus through a formal or informal contractual relationship.

TRAVEL-EXPENSE PAYMENT

Travel expenses may be paid either by reimbursement to the traveler or direct payment to a provider/merchant (e.g., airline ticket through a contract agency, direct billing from hotel).

Requests to reimburse travel expenses must be made via the campus travel reimbursement process. Requests for reimbursement must be accompanied by receipts, when required.  Direct payments/reimbursements from the University of Oregon Foundation are subject to that organization’s policies and processes.

Travel advance funds may be requested from and approved by Business Affairs.

When employees travel together, it may be expedient for one employee to pay and claim reimbursement for certain expenses of other employees. Reimbursement for multiple employees is only allowed when actual expenses are being reimbursed and are supported by receipts. Deductions are made from the per diem amounts for employees involved. 

TAX TREATMENT

The university reimburses for travel expenses under an IRS Accountable Plan and in accordance with IRS Publication 463 (Travel, Entertainment, Gift, and Car Expenses) and IRS Publication 519 (U.S. Tax Guide for Aliens).  This includes the provision that expenses be accounted for within a reasonable period of time.

Reimbursement of travel expenses for temporary assignments (less than one year in duration) are generally not taxable to the employee. If the assignment is indefinite, the employee is considered to have moved to the new work location. Reimbursement of expenses for indefinite travel is generally taxable to the employee.

STUDENTS, STUDENT GROUPS, AND TEAMS

[1] Student Travel

University policy on Traffic, Parking and Vehicle Safety (former OAR 580-40-0030) provides guidelines regarding transportation of students in a state owned, leased or controlled vehicle.

 [2] Travel Expenses of Others

A university employee, such as a coach, athletic director, or group leader, may pay for the travel expenses of the team or group members.  Refer to travel procedures for documentation requirements.

[3] One-Day Trips

Meal expenses for an athletic team or student group on a one-day trip may be reimbursed at actual cost (as opposed to per diem). An itemized receipt is required. University employees such as coaches, trainers, or group leaders who accompany and are responsible for the care, custody, or control of the team or group are also eligible for meal-expense reimbursement. The request for reimbursement must state that the expenses result from a trip by an athletic team or student group.

TRAVEL PAID BY OUTSIDE SOURCE

Outside entities may reimburse the campus, pay a service provider directly, or reimburse a university employee for travel expenses related to university business. The university will not pay or reimburse for any travel expenses that are also being paid by an outside source directly to the university employee. 

MEAL AND INCIDENTAL EXPENSES

[1] General

Generally, meal and incidental expenses are reimbursed at a per diem rate. Meal and incidental expenses may be reimbursed only if the traveler qualifies for lodging-expense reimbursement, except as noted herein.

Travelers are eligible for 75% of the meal and incidental expenses per diem amount on the initial and final day of travel.  Travelers are eligible for 100% of the meal and incidental expenses per diem on all other travel days.

For the day the traveler leaves on a trip, the per diem rate specified for where the traveler will spend the night is used. For the day the traveler returns from a trip, the per diem rate specified for the last location where the traveler stayed overnight is used.

Applicable meal and incidental expense per diem may not be claimed if a meal is provided and consumed as part of a hosted function (e.g., a conference registration fee includes a meal, meals are included with lodging rate) or included with a roomette/bedroom railroad rate or international flight. The per diem rate for a full day's meal and incidental expenses is apportioned as follows:

  • breakfast: 25%
  • lunch: 25%
  • dinner: 50%.

Meal and incidental expense per diem is not apportioned for the initial and final day of travel (even if a meal is provided and consumed)

[2] Actual Meal-Expense Reimbursement

Reimbursement for meals at actual expense (including gratuity) instead of per diem rate is allowed when hosting official guests and groups (See Fiscal Policy 56.100 – Non-Travel Meals, Refreshments, and Hospitality Expenses).  

[3] Meals on One-Day Trips

When a traveler departs and returns the same day, meal expenses are reimbursed only in the following cases:

[a] When traveling as a University of Oregon Board of Trustees member or unpaid member of a university advisory committee

[b] When a meal at a convention, conference, or meeting is part of the agenda and the cost of the meal has not previously been paid with the registration fee

[c] When directed or required to attend mealtime business meetings, including community or public relations meetings

[d] Trips by athletic teams and student groups (see STUDENTS, STUDENT GROUPS, AND TEAMS above)

Lunches on one-day trips will not be reimbursed except in circumstances [a] - [d] listed above.

The IRS considers breakfast and dinner allowances, figured on the basis of hours worked (such as those permitted under [e] [f] below, to be taxable to the employee. Breakfast and dinner allowances are not available to non-employees.

[e] When an employee leaves his/her official station two or more hours before his/her regular work shift, s/he will receive the breakfast allowance

[f] When an employee returns to his/her official station two or more hours after his/her regular work shift, s/he will receive the dinner allowance

[4] Incidental Expenses

Incident Expenses are combined with meals into a single rate.

The university references IRS Publication 463 (Travel, Entertainment, Gift, and Car Expenses) for the definition of domestic-travel incidental expenses and the U.S. Department of State for the definition of foreign-travel incidental expenses.

LODGING

Lodging expenses are normally reimbursed when authorized campus personnel determine that the traveler would not reasonably be expected to return to his or her residence between work shifts. Generally, lodging is reimbursed at actual cost up to per diem rates. Exceptions to per diem maximum may be granted with appropriate justification. Common exceptions include:

  • Conferences
  • Traditionally high-cost locations (e.g., New York City; Washington, DC; San Francisco Bay Area; Boston; Seattle)
  • Cities where a per diem hotel is not available within a reasonable distance [e.g., twenty (20) minute drive] of the primary business location

[1] Lodging Receipts Requirements

Receipts for lodging are required and must show the following:

  • Traveler's name (or names)
  • Date(s) occupied
  • Itemization of Charges
  • Settlement in Full

[2] Taxes on Lodging

Lodging taxes at domestic locations are reimbursed as part of the actual lodging cost calculation, but are not included when determining if lodging cost has exceeded the per diem rate maximum.  Lodging taxes at international locations are included as part of the per diem.

[3] Non-commercial Lodging

The intent of the non-commercial lodging per diem is to reimburse travelers using non-commercial facilities (e.g., travel trailer, motor home, or staying with friends or family members) and should result in an economic benefit for the university.  For current rate, see [Link to per diem rates]

For purposes of reimbursement rates and per diem limits, lodging arranged through services such as Airbnb is considered Commercial Lodging.

In certain circumstances, alternate lodging arrangements (e.g., leased apartment) may be considered most appropriate.  Contact the BAO Travel Office for additional information and consideration.

TRANSPORTATION

Transportation expenses incurred while traveling on official business may be reimbursed. Personal expenses, such as private vehicle repair and maintenance, may not. The following expenses may be reimbursed or paid directly:

  • Common carrier fare
  • Rental Vehicle charges
  • Private-vehicle mileage allowance
  • Taxi or shuttle service fare (including gratuity)
  • Parking and garage fees

COMMON CARRIER FARES

Transportation by common carrier is recommended when it is more appropriate and economical than travel by state or private vehicle. Common carriers are usually preferred for out-of-state travel. Actual cost is paid or reimbursed for airline, railroad and bus fares for travel.

[1] Airlines

All employees are encouraged to travel using routes, schedules, and airlines that provide the most cost-effective, efficient travel that meets the business purpose. Economy Plus and/or Business Class airfare are authorized for any leg of international flights where the elapsed time in-the-air is eight hours or greater. First Class airfare is not authorized.

Air travel paid from federal funds must conform to the Fly America Act. 

[2] Taxis and Shuttle Services

Taxi and shuttle service is authorized between terminals, lodgings, and work stations.

[3] Railroads

All employees are encouraged to travel using routes and schedules that provide the most cost-effective, efficient travel that meets the business purpose. A roomette is allowed when sleeping accommodations are needed due to overnight travel. A bedroom is allowed if no roomette is available or if special accommodations are approved because of the trip's nature or the traveler's health.  Applicable meal and incidental expense per diem may not be claimed if a meal is provided and consumed as part of the roomette or bedroom rate.

[4] Bus Lines

Scheduled or charter buses may be used.

[5] Travel Awards and Frequent Flyer Mileage

Because the cost of record-keeping outweighs any monetary benefit, the university will not recapture airline bonuses awarded employees for frequent flyer miles. Frequent flyer bonuses may be used by employees as they choose unless the terms of a grant or contract require otherwise. The university will not reimburse or trade tickets purchased using frequent flyer miles.

[6] Payment in Lieu of Air Travel

Common carriers (e.g., airlines, railroads) are usually preferred for out-of-state travel.  An employee may choose to travel by private vehicle instead. In such a case, the employee may be reimbursed for ground transportation expenses, including standard mileage, parking, and tolls, up to the cost that would have been incurred had s/he traveled by common carrier.

The following costs associated with air travel can be used as a basis for comparison:

  • The cost of round-trip commercial air fare that would have been incurred.  An online quote (i.e., Travelocity, Orbitz) should be obtained prior to the travel dates.
  • Private vehicle mileage to and from the air terminal that would normally be used for departure.
  • Lodging, meal, and incidental expenses that the employee would normally incur with air travel

PRIVATE VEHICLES

Private Vehicles may be utilized for business-related travel.

The per-mile reimbursement rate is determined by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  Employees who receive a Car Allowance Stipend are not eligible for per-mile reimbursement.

Mileage for the most direct, usually-traveled route may be reimbursed.

[1] Highway mileage

Use standard mileage guides, odometer/tripometer readings, or online mapping tools (e.g., Mapquest.com). Substantial deviations from standard distances or usual routes must be justified. Mileage calculations generally start at the employee's official work station.

[2] Local mileage

Travel between work places and travel between lodging and restaurants for a traveler's sustenance, health, and comfort may be reimbursed if meals cannot be obtained at the temporary duty or lodging sites. Travel for personal reasons or entertainment may not be reimbursed.

Travel between the employee’s home and official work station is considered commuting expense and may not be reimbursed.

Employees and agents authorized to use their privately owned vehicles for official business are required to have personal automobile liability insurance to provide the primary coverage for any accidents involving that vehicle. University-provided automobile liability coverage will apply on a limited basis after the employee's primary coverage limits have been used. The university does not provide physical damage, uninsured motorist and personal injury protection for personal vehicles.  For additional information, contact the Office of Risk Management.

VEHICLE RENTAL

Vehicle rental expenses may be reimbursed. A car, boat, aircraft or other vehicle may be rented when it is the most cost-effective, efficient means of transportation that meets the business purpose. Receipts are required for vehicle rentals. Employees are encouraged to utilize State of Oregon contracts which provide discount rates, car upgrades, and insurance coverage. Employees are also encouraged to use their corporate travel cards when renting vehicles because of the primary Collision Damage Waiver (CDW) coverage provided.

[1] Insurance on Rented Vehicles

The university provides self-insurance coverage for rental vehicles if they are to be used exclusively for official business. A certificate of insurance may be obtained from the Office of Risk Management

If a rental vehicle is to be used for a mix of personal and business purposes, the university’s self-insurance coverage is only applicable for the portion of travel applicable to official business. The employee or agent will want to check with his/her insurance agent regarding coverage for personal usage.

If the employee or agent plans to travel outside the United States, its territories and possessions, and Canada, the department should contact the Office of Risk Management for help in obtaining the appropriate coverage.

 [2] Responsibilities After an Accident

The renter of a vehicle involved in an accident is responsible for immediately reporting the accident to the Office of Risk Management.

LOANED VEHICLES

Use of loaned vehicles may be authorized when it benefits the campus. Expense reimbursement is for use of the vehicle regardless of the number of passengers. Some companies may lend vehicles to campuses, departments, or individuals for specified purposes. The operator is reimbursed for actual out-of-pocket expenses arising from using the vehicle for official business.

[1] Insurance on Loaned Vehicles

The university provides coverage for loaned vehicles if the campus has agreed in writing to accept responsibility for any liability or damage to the vehicle. The loaned vehicle must be used for official business.

For additional information, including the loan agreement form, contact the Office of Risk Management.

STATE-OWNED VEHICLES

Motor pool vehicles may be used for official state business only. Use of a state vehicle is not authorized when costs are charged to Agency Funds, except for use by Campus Organizations or for other legitimate state business purposes as approved by authorized campus personnel. The department that authorizes a state vehicle's use is financially accountable for damages and all costs resulting from violations of policies relating to state vehicle use.

[1] Private Use Prohibited

Using a state-owned vehicle for private purposes or allowing another person to do so is prohibited (ORS 283.395) and punishable, upon conviction, by a fine (ORS 283.990).

[2] Vehicle Safety Including Authorized Drivers

University policy on Traffic, Parking and Vehicle Safety (former OAR 580-40-0030) provides safety guidelines regarding transportation in a state owned, leased or controlled vehicle.

[3] Overnight Parking at Employee's Residence

A state vehicle may be kept overnight at an employee's residence when doing so is approved in advance by authorized campus personnel.

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES

Necessary business-related travel expenses are normally reimbursed. Personal expenses are not reimbursed. The university establishes the definition of miscellaneous expenses. All miscellaneous expenses must be itemized.

Necessary miscellaneous business-related expenses are not reimbursed using a per diem; rather, if the traveler has incurred a miscellaneous business expense as outlined below, that expense is reimbursable at the actual cost.

[1] Checked Baggage

Up to two (2) standard-weight bags (standard weight as defined by the airline used)

Charges for the following may be reimbursed only when necessary for the business purpose and approved by authorized institution personnel (receipts required):

  • additional baggage (more than 2 bags)
  • overweight/oversize baggage

[2] Other Business Related Expenses Normally Reimbursed

  • Telephone
  • Fax
  • Internet
  • Postage
  • ATM cash advance fees
  • Materials and supplies purchased to meet an immediate business need
  • Visa and passport expenses
  • Parking
  • Tolls
  • Energy surcharge

PER DIEM RATE REFERENCES

Per diem rates for the continental United States are determined using the federal rate in the IRS's High-Low Substantiation Method.

Per diem rates for the non-continental United States and Territories (e.g., Alaska, Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico) are determined by the US Department of Defense

Per diem rates for foreign locations are determined by the US Department of State

OTHER RESOURCES

U.S. States & Territories

EXCEPTIONS

Upon consideration of documented extenuating circumstances, exceptions to these policy provisions may be granted by the Vice President for Finance and Administration (VPFA) or designee.

 

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume IV: Finance, Administration and Infrastructure
  • Chapter 4: Business affairs
Responsible Office: 

For questions about this policy, please contact the office the Vice President for Finance and Administration at 541-346-3003.

Original Source: 
UO Policy (New)

Residence Halls, Reimbursement for Space Used on a Temporary Basis

Policy Number: 
III.02.05
Reason for Policy: 

To articulate guidelines by which University Housing should be reimbursed for residence hall spaces temporarily used for other purposes.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

University Housing; departments using space within University Housing

Enactment & Revision History: 

Technical amendments made by the University Secretary on March 22, 2017.

Became UO policy by operation of law on July 1, 2014.

Adopted by the Oregon State Board of Higher Education July 26, 1971.

Policy: 

When University Housing spaces are used for educational or administrative purposes on a temporary basis, payment shall cover utilities, maintenance, insurance, administrative costs, and the same rate of debt service that is required for the space used as dormitories.

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume III: Administration of Student Affairs
  • Chapter 2: Housing and residence life
Responsible Office: 

For questions about this policy, please contact University Housing (housing@uoregon.edu, 541.346.4277) or Student Services and Enrollment Management (ssem@uoregon.edu, 541.346.9386).

Safety - Physical Space and Environment

Policy Number: 
IV.05.01
Reason for Policy: 

To protect human health and the environment, ensure regulatory compliance, and preserve university interests and assets.

Entities Affected by this Policy: 

All members of the UO community and visitors.

Enactment & Revision History: 

Revisions, merge and renumbering approved by University President Michael Schill on 03/03/2017

Title change from University Safety to Safety on 10/05/2010 

Policy number revised from 8.000 to 08.00.02 on 02/08/2010

Approved by President’s staff on 10/11/2000

Policy: 

Safety - Physical Space and Environment Policy

I. Responsibilities

  1. Safety is the shared responsibility of everyone.  The president expects all university personnel to support the university’s safety policy and associated procedures. 
  1. The provost and vice presidents are responsible to ensure implementation and enforcement of this policy in all facilities and operations within their respective portfolios.
  1. All administrators, deans, department heads, directors, supervisors and/or principal investigators are directly accountable for the safety and health of the total environment(s) (work and/or living) for which they are responsible. This includes all students, visitors, staff, the environment and university property for which they have oversight. This also includes establishment and management of safety programs and ongoing support by each unit for safety, including the provision of appropriate training and personal protective equipment.
  1. Safety and Risk Services is responsible for providing training, technical expertise and assistance to campus partners regarding compliance with laws, regulations, and policies and the protection of human health and the environment. The University Safety Representative is an employee in Safety and Risk Services and is responsible for responding to employee inquiries about safety.
  1. All employees are responsible for reporting accidents, unsafe working conditions or hazards of any nature. Such a report shall be made to an immediate supervisor who shall report the situation to the appropriate person or office for action except in instances of immediate medical attention needs when 9-1-1 should be the first notification.
  1. The University will annually advise employees of the name and contact information of the University Safety Representative.

II. Imminent Danger

In case of imminent danger to life or health, Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), the University Fire Marshal, and/or a designee of either has authority to suspend an activity immediately until the hazardous condition is abated or adequate measures are taken to minimize exposure of students, faculty, staff, visitors and the environment to that danger.

III. Corrective Action and Reporting

  1. If after reporting to the supervisor that a specific task or assignment may jeopardize personal health or safety, and correction is not made, the employee may refuse to perform such activity without penalty until the appropriate health or safety representative has reviewed the situation and made a finding. Any employee has the right to report any unsafe or hazardous condition directly to a safety representative or to appropriate local, state, or federal authorities.
  1. Safety violations, injury reports, and corrections made will be reviewed and reported to the university’s Safety Advisory Committee at its regularly scheduled meeting.

IV. Committees

Safety and Risk Services unit may form such committees as the head of that unit deems necessary and appropriate to ensure and maintain regulatory compliance.

Chapter/Volume: 
  • Volume IV: Finance, Administration and Infrastructure
  • Chapter 5: Public Safety and Risk Services
Responsible Office: 

Safety and Risk Services, (541) 346-3192, entriskserv@uoregon.edu

Original Source: 
UO Policy Statement

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